Global Human Population Rise

World Population Rise

(From 1 Million to 10 Billion)

UPDATE: Since the time in which this article was originally published (2016, Life, The Universe & Free Thinking), the human global population has surpassed the forecast in rise. Now, in mid-2018, the population has reached almost 7.7 billion, a figure originally forecast for 2021. It is therefore reasonable to assume that, by the year 2100, the population will be much closer to 11 billion than 10 billion.

These statistics, from the Dawn of Man to the end of the 21st Century, are gathered from a number of sources and show the increase in Earth’s human population. I compiled these figured because I couldn’t find a single source which was anywhere near so complete.

The population crisis is a big problem that isn’t going away, and yet so few people care about it. This is probably because it’s only just beginning to be significantly recognised, and for the generations currently alive it’s not quite as big a deal as it’s going to be in the decades to come for our future generations.

Whenever I hear of someone proudly telling the people in their little bubble of reality that they’ve just brought their third, fourth, fifth or sixth (ad nauseum) child into the world, I bristle slightly knowing how clueless these people are when it comes to Earth’s bigger issues.

I should point out at this juncture that if we watched the statistics go further back in time to before the population reached one million, we would not finally arrive at Adam and Eve. The Creationism theory is utterly laughable, and very worthy of ridicule and satire. So worthy, in fact, that I wrote a story about it.

Anatomically modern humans – or homo sapiens – entered the timetline approximately 130,000 years ago. 120,000 years later, it reached a global population of approximately 1 million.

Now, let’s witness the rise…

Year Population
10,000 BC 1 Million
9,500 BC 2 Million
9,000 BC 3 Million
8,500 BC 4 Million
8,000 BC 5 Million
7,500 BC 5 Million
7,000 BC 5 Million
6,500 BC 5 Million
6,000 BC 5 Million
5,500 BC 5 Million
5,000 BC 5 Million
4,500 BC 6 Million
4,000 BC 7 Million
3,500 BC 10 Million
3,000 BC 14 Million
2,500 BC 20 Million
2,000 BC 27 Million
1,500 BC 38 Million
1,000 BC 50 Million
500 BC 100 Million
1 AD 170 Million
500 AD 190 Million
1000 AD 254 Million
1500 AD 425 Million
1650 500 Million
1750 700 Million
1804 1 Billion

It took 11,650 years for the population of humanity to grow from 1 million to 0.5 billion. It then took half a century for that figure to double to 1 billion.

Year Population
1850 1.2 Billion
1900 1.6 Billion
1927 2 Billion

Then, in scarcely more than a century, the population doubled to 2 billion, despite global conflicts and other factors such as epidemics and natural distasters.

Now watch what happens…

Year Population Growth % Change
1950 2,555,982,611 1.47 37,768,237
1951 2,593,750,848 1.61 42,042,862
1952 2,635,793,710 1.70 45,320,983
1953 2,681,114,693 1.77 47,842,880
1954 2,728,957,573 1.86 51,339,043
1955 2,780,296,616 1.88 52,854,158
1956 2,833,150,774 1.95 55,718,773
1957 2,888,869,547 1.93 56,393,986
1958 2,945,263,533 1.76 52,218,932
1959 2,997,482,465 1.39 41,951,479
1960 3,039,433,944 1.33 40,629,803

This time, it took a little more than 100 years to reach the next milestone of 3 billion. In fact, it took a lot less time – just 3 decades.

And on we go…

Year Population Growth % Change
1961 3,080,063,747 1.80 56,018,983
1962 3,136,082,730 2.19 69,405,494
1963 3,205,488,224 2.19 71,002,977
1964 3,276,491,201 2.08 68,918,678
1965 3,345,409,879 2.07 70,135,995
1966 3,415,545,874 2.02 69,649,013
1967 3,485,194,887 2.04 71,751,266
1968 3,556,946,153 2.07 74,532,014
1969 3,631,478,167 2.05 75,123,281
1970 3,706,601,448 2.07 77,395,382
1971 3,783,996,830 2.01 76,793,114
1972 3,860,789,944 1.96 76,389,273
1973 3,937,179,217 1.91 75,725,073
1974 4,012,904,290 1.81 73,483,375

In less than 1.5 decades the population surpassed another milestone of 4 billion.

1975 4,086,387,665 1.75 72,049,425
1976 4,158,437,090 1.72 72,331,131
1977 4,230,768,221 1.69 72,268,962
1978 4,303,037,183 1.73 75,188,498
1979 4,378,225,681 1.71 75,638,139
1980 4,453,863,820 1.69 76,035,404
1981 4,529,899,224 1.75 80,163,373
1982 4,610,062,597 1.73 80,244,759
1983 4,690,307,356 1.68 79,323,181
1984 4,769,630,537 1.68 80,594,461
1985 4,850,224,998 1.68 82,355,074
1986 4,932,580,072 1.72 85,713,224
1987 5,018,293,296 1.71 86,343,509

In scarcely more than a decade, the next milestone of 5 billion was smashed in short order.

1988 5,104,636,805 1.67 86,061,173
1989 5,190,697,978 1.66 87,027,432
1990 5,277,725,410 1.56 82,903,255
1991 5,360,628,665 1.54 83,112,161
1992 5,443,740,826 1.50 82,013,172
1993 5,525,753,998 1.45 80,584,690
1994 5,606,338,688 1.43 80,672,638
1995 5,687,011,326 1.39 79,424,294
1996 5,766,435,620 1.39 80,435,809
1997 5,846,871,429 1.34 78,899,442
1998 5,925,770,871 1.31 78,001,123
1999 6,003,771,994 1.28 77,230,943

Again, in less than a decade and a half we hit the 6 billion milestone. 6 billion is the number many people today will still give you if you ask them what they think the world population is. We hurtled past that figure of 6 billion at the turn of the millennium.

In just 50 years the population rocketed from 2.5 billion to a staggering 6 billion.

But we weren’t content to level off at that…

Year Population Growth % Change
2000 6,081,002,937 1.25 76,753,814
2001 6,157,756,751 1.24 76,520,745
2002 6,234,277,496 1.22 76,271,568
2003 6,310,549,064 1.20 75,993,822
2004 6,386,542,886 1.18 75,638,540
2005 6,462,181,426 1.16 75,478,997
2006 6,537,660,423 1.15 75,561,947
2007 6,613,222,370 1.14 75,666,070
2008 6,688,888,440 1.13 75,761,868
2009 6,764,650,308 1.11 75,772,948
2010 6,840,423,256 1.10 75,755,042
2011 6,916,178,298 1.09 75,622,621
2012 6,991,800,919 1.07 75,164,045
2013 7,066,964,964 1.05 74,468,973

Maintaing the now fashionable growth-over-time rise, the population pushed beyond the 7 billion milestone, again in less than 1.5 decades.

And still it continues its inexorable climb…

Year Population Growth % Change
2014 7,141,433,937 1.03 73,604,414

2015 7,215,038,351 1.00 72,747,545

2016 7,287,785,896 0.98 71,952,940
2017 7,359,738,836 0.96 71,088,531
2018 7,430,827,367 0.94 70,179,131
2019 7,501,006,498 0.92 69,208,946
2020 7,570,215,444 0.90 68,403,637
2021 7,638,619,081 0.88 67,761,184
2022 7,706,380,265 0.87 67,032,267
2023 7,773,412,532 0.85 66,280,271
2024 7,839,692,803 0.83 65,515,814
2025 7,905,208,617 0.82 64,887,452
2026 7,970,096,069 0.80 64,391,358
2027 8,034,487,427 0.79 63,850,629

Statistical forecasts show we’ll have bypassed a global population of more than 8 BILLION by the mid-2020s. This milestone will once more be reached in less than 15 years after the previous milestone. At this juncture, it will be obvious that the planet is struggling to cope with the demands placed on it by the spreading infestation of humans.

But we won’t take heed of the warning signs…

Year Population Growth % Change
2028 8,098,338,056 0.78 63,326,564
2029 8,161,664,620 0.77 62,837,502
2030 8,224,502,122 0.76 62,407,650
2031 8,286,909,772 0.75 61,984,643
2032 8,348,894,415 0.73 61,437,162
2033 8,410,331,577 0.72 60,846,930
2034 8,471,178,507 0.71 60,249,755
2035 8,531,428,262 0.70 59,603,503
2036 8,591,031,765 0.68 58,850,482
2037 8,649,882,247 0.67 57,857,590
2038 8,707,739,837 0.65 56,748,673
2039 8,764,488,510 0.63 55,671,500
2040 8,820,160,010 0.62 54,564,430
2041 8,874,724,440 0.60 53,400,952
2042 8,928,125,392 0.58 52,118,097
2043 8,980,243,489 0.56 50,792,416
2044 9,031,035,905 0.55 49,544,606

The rise has begun to slow, albeit not by much, for several reasons including not enough food and water for everyone, a constant reduction in trees and other plantlife essential for an ecosystem capable of maintaining life on Earth, and the density of gathered ‘pocket’ populations approaching their manageable limits.

But will we learn? Let’s see…

Year Population Growth % Change
2045 9,080,580,511 0.53 48,328,264
2046 9,128,908,775 0.51 47,094,361
2047 9,176,003,136 0.50 45,729,012
2048 9,221,732,148 0.48 44,309,707
2049 9,266,041,855 0.46 43,009,684
2050 9,309,051,539 0.39 36,202,585
2083 10,000,374,225 0.10 9,793,194
2099 10,119,990,877 0.05 4,935,319

More than 50 years this time to jump from 9 billion to 10 billion. No, we didn’t learn, we just pushed those limits to even higher extremes. One of the main reasons the growth has slowed will be because the annual death percentage will increase, and many of those will be babies and young chldren due to the appalling conditions of the highly-populated areas.

Many believe the population level will peak at around the 10 billion mark. There are multiple contributing factors to this theory, but the main reasons are ever-dwindling fuel supplies, a ever-increasing food demand, a lack of resources in general, and increasingly fewer areas of untainted nature as urban areas continue to spread. The average temperature will have risen across the globe, including the polar regions. Global economy will likely be at crisis level. In short, the future for the planet Earth and the human race is a rather grim one, and one of the biggest reasons is the birth-to-death ratio.

But then, perhaps we shouldn’t really worry too much. After all, Earth has always had a joker up its sleeve for these sorts of situations…

Copyright © 2016, 2018 Scott Kaelen
Life, The Universe & Free Thinking

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