Global Population Rise (Past, Present & Future)

These statistics, from the Dawn of Man to the end of the 21st century, are gathered from a number of sources and show the increase in Earth’s human population. I compiled these figures because I couldn’t find a single source which was anywhere near so complete.

The population crisis is a big problem that isn’t going away, and yet so few people care about it. This is probably because it’s only just beginning to be significantly recognised, and for the generations currently alive it’s not quite as big a deal as it’s going to be in the decades to come for our future generations.

So, let’s witness the rise…


Year
Population
10,000 BC 1 Million
9,500 BC 2 Million
9,000 BC 3 Million
8,500 BC 4 Million
8,000 BC 5 Million
7,500 BC 5 Million
7,000 BC 5 Million
6,500 BC 5 Million
6,000 BC 5 Million
5,500 BC 5 Million
5,000 BC 5 Million
4,500 BC 6 Million
4,000 BC 7 Million
3,500 BC 10 Million
3,000 BC 14 Million
2,500 BC 20 Million
2,000 BC 27 Million
1,500 BC 38 Million
1,000 BC 50 Million
500 BC 100 Million
1 AD 170 Million
500 AD 190 Million
1000 AD 254 Million
1500 AD 425 Million
1650 500 Million
1750 700 Million
1804 1 Billion


Now watch what happens…


Year
Population
1850 1.2 Billion
1900 1.6 Billion
1927 2 Billion


It took 11,650 years for humanity to swell from a million to half a billion, then a mere fifty years to double to 1 billion. Then, in scarcely more than a century, the population doubled to 2 billion, despite global conflicts and other factors such as epidemics and natural disasters.


Year
Population Growth %
1950 2,556,000,000 1.47
1951 2,594,000,000 1.61
1952 2,636,000,000 1.70
1953 2,681,000,000 1.77
1954 2,729,000,000 1.86
1955 2,780,000,000 1.88
1956 2,833,000,000 1.95
1957 2,889,000,000 1.93
1958 2,945,000,000 1.76
1959 2,997,000,000 1.39
1960 3,039,000,000 1.33


It took less than 100 years to reach the 3 billion milestone. In fact, it took considerably less time – 3 decades.


Year
Population Growth %
1961 3,080,000,000 1.80
1962 3,136,000,000 2.19
1963 3,205,000,000 2.19
1964 3,276,000,000 2.08
1965 3,345,000,000 2.07
1966 3,416,000,000 2.02
1967 3,485,000,000 2.04
1968 3,557,000,000 2.07
1969 3,631,000,000 2.05
1970 3,707,000,000 2.07
1971 3,784,000,000 2.01
1972 3,861,000,000 1.96
1973 3,937,000,000 1.91
1974 4,013,000,000 1.81


Halving the aforementioned three decades, the population surpassed the 4 billion milestone. But this was the 60s and 70s, right? Surely there existed no better excuse, with so-called ‘free love’ roaming rampant?


Year
Population Growth %
1975 4,086,000,000 1.75
1976 4,158,000,000 1.72
1977 4,231,000,000 1.69
1978 4,303,000,000 1.73
1979 4,378,000,000 1.71
1980 4,454,000,000 1.69
1981 4,530,000,000 1.75
1982 4,610,000,000 1.73
1983 4,690,000,000 1.68
1984 4,770,000,000 1.68
1985 4,850,000,000 1.68
1986 4,933,000,000 1.72
1987 5,018,000,000 1.71
1988 5,105,000,000 1.67
1989 5,191,000,000 1.66


In scarcely more than a decade, the next milestone of 5 billion was smashed in short order.


Year
Population Growth %
1990 5,278,000,000 1.56
1991 5,361,000,000 1.54
1992 5,444,000,000 1.50
1993 5,526,000,000 1.45
1994 5,606,000,000 1.43
1995 5,687,000,000 1.39
1996 5,766,000,000 1.39
1997 5,847,000,000 1.34
1998 5,926,000,000 1.31
1999 6,004,000,000 1.28


Again, in less than 15 years we hit the next milestone. 6 billion is the number many people today will still give you if you ask them what they think the world population is. We hurtled beyond 6 billion at the turn of the millennium. In just 50 years the population rocketed from 2.5 billion to a staggering 6 billion. But, like cancerous cells, we still weren’t content…

Year Population Growth %
2000 6,081,000,000 1.25
2001 6,158,000,000 1.24
2002 6,234,000,000 1.22
2003 6,311,000,000 1.20
2004 6,387,000,000 1.18
2005 6,462,000,000 1.16
2006 6,538,000,000 1.15
2007 6,613,000,000 1.14
2008 6,689,000,000 1.13
2009 6,765,000,000 1.11
2010 6,840,000,000 1.10
2011 6,916,000,000 1.09
2012 6,992,000,000 1.07
2013 7,067,000,000 1.05


Maintaining the now fashionable growth-over-time rise, the population pushed beyond the 7 billion milestone, again in less than 1.5 decades. And still it continues its inexorable climb…


Year
Population
2014 7,141,000,000
2015 7,215,000,000
2016 7,400,000,000
2019 7.700,000,000


The above numbers from recent years are taken from the World Population Clock. On we go into the future…


Year
Population
2025 8,000,000,000

Statistical forecasts show we’ll have bypassed a global population of more than eight billion by the mid-2020s. At this juncture it will be obvious that the planet is struggling to cope with the demands placed on it by the spreading infestation of humans. But we won’t take heed of the warning signs…


Year Population
2030 8,300,000,000
2035 8,600,000,000
2040 8,900,000,000
2045 9,200,000,000


At this point there should be a very slight decrease in the annual percentage of population growth, for several reasons including not enough food and water for everyone, a constant reduction in trees and other plant-life essential for an ecosystem capable of maintaining life on Earth, and the density of gathered ‘pocket’ populations approaching their manageable limits. But will we learn? Let’s see…


Year
Population
2050 9,700,000,000
2075 10,600,000,000
2100 11,200,000,000


More than 50 years this time to jump from over nine and a half billion to over eleven billion. No, we don’t learn, we just push the limits to even higher extremes. The growth will still be slowing, albeit marginally, but it is not obvious by looking at these figures, because while the percentage population growth will diminish slightly, the actual amount of more people on the planet could remain at an almost constant annual rate. One of the main reasons for the slowdown will be the increase in the annual death percentage; many of the dead will be babies and young children due to the appalling conditions of the highly-populated areas.


Many people believe the population level could potentially peak at somewhere between 10 and 12 billion. There are multiple contributing factors to this theory, but the main reasons are ever-dwindling fuel supplies, an ever-increasing food demand, a lack of resources in general, and increasingly fewer areas of untainted nature as urban areas continue to spread. The average temperature will have risen across the globe, including the polar regions. Global economy will likely be at crisis level. In short, the future for the planet Earth and the human race is a rather grim one, and one of the biggest reasons is the birth-to-death ratio of one single creature – homo sapiens.

But perhaps we shouldn’t really worry too much about all of this. After all, Earth has always held a card up its sleeve for these sorts of situations…

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